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(First upload on September 18 2007. Last on September 3 2017) [ 日本語 | English ]

Salix reinii Franch. et Savat. ex Seemen






Mount Usu / Sarobetsu post-mined peatland
From left: Crater basin in 1986 and 2006. Cottongrass / Daylily

Salix L. (ヤナギ)
Mineyanagi (ミネヤナギ, 峰柳), Japanese willow or Miyama willow (tentative)
Miyamayanagi (ミヤマヤナギ, 深山柳)
Lifeform: deciduous shrub ≈ 1-2 m tall (or less → higly variable, occasionally becoming at 5 m tall in lowland)
Distribution: Japan and southern Kuril Islands (Ohwi & Kitagawa 1983)
Habitat: alpine and subalpine zones, serpentine zones

⇒ flora on Mount Koma, Mount Usu
Mount Eniwa
Mount Yotei

Salix
Patches in permanent
plots
on the summit area
of Mount Koma on July 4
2002.

Synonyms

Salix reinii Franch. et Sav. ex Seemen f. cyclophylloides (Koidz.) Kimura ex Ohwi et Kitag., nom. nud.
Salix shikotanica Kimura

f. eriocarpa (Kimura) T. Shimizu (キヌゲミヤマヤナギ): Hokkaido - Honshu, floccose hair on ovary
f. pendula Kimura (シダレミネヤナギ)

Salix reinii on mountains in Hokkaido



Mount Koma

Salix1 Salix2 Salix3
[1] a S. reinii patch with flowering Platanthera metabifolia on July 18 1996. The relationships of these two species may be explained by facilitation (定着促進効果) (Uesaka & 2004). [2] a black instrument on the ground surface is a PAR sensor on June 27 2005. [3] on June 16 2015.

Salix4 Salix5 Salix6
[4/5] leaf flushing with inflorescences on May 18 2012. [6] Snow was accumulated in the leeward of S. reinii patches that functioned as a shelter to prevent from frost injury (on November 21 2005. The patches greatly change the microclimate (Tsuyuzaki et al. 2012).

ECM on S. reinii roots

索引

ECM ECM
Fig. Ectomycorrhizae from the roots of S. reinii. M: mantle. The sample was collected from the southwest slope of Mount Koma (Tsuyuzaki et al. 2005)

Mount Tarumae

Salix1 Salix2
[1] a patch. [2] close-up of inflorescences. On June 12 2008.

Mount Yotei

Salix1 Salix2 Salix3
[1-3] near the summit on June 28 2014.

Mount Tokachi

Salix1
[1] near the bothie (hut escaped from mountainous disasters) of Mount Tokachi, central Hokkaido, on June 27 2017.

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